Dave Elder-Vass: Online Resources


Open access versions of papers

Pre-publication versions of many of my older papers can be downloaded from my page on academia.edu.

Versions of many of my more recent papers can be downloaded from Loughborough University's institutional repository.


Videos

#NEW!#Social Science and Realism after Assemblage Theory. A webinar, featuring Tim Rutzou and Dave Elder-Vass, recorded June 2017.

'How to think differently about the economy'. My TEDx LoughboroughU talk, 12 November 2016.

'Causal powers, the social and the material'. A talk on the materiality of the social at the IACR annual conference in Cardiff, July 2016.

'What is real and what is social in social construction?' My contribution to an interdisciplinary debate in Helsinki, February 2014.


Blogs

You can find my own blog 'Materially Social' here and I also tweet occasionally.

Daniel Little has reviewed some of my work in his impressive blog 'Understanding Society'. Most recently he posted an excellent review of Profit and Gift in the Digital Economy and kindly invited me to provide a guest post in response. He has also posted on The Causal Power of Social Structures in April 2011, reviewed The Reality of Social Construction, and published my brief reply to his review, discussing 'Social construction and the reliability of knowledge' (August 2012).


Podcasts

#NEW!#A conversation with Dave Elder-Vass about the Digital Economy. A podcast by Mark Carrigan, recorded in May 2017.

Prosumption, Appropriation and the Ontology of Economic Form. Paper presented at the Centre for Social Ontology at Warwick on 27 January 2015.

Interview with Mark Carrigan. An interview recorded in January 2011, discussing my book 'The Causal Power of Social Structures'.


Working papers

'Towards a social ontology of market systems', CRESI Working Paper 2009-06. This working paper outlines a planned project, which aims to construct a realistic ontological analysis of market systems, developed using a critical realist methodology. Market systems, it will argue, are social structures that depend ontologically upon both human individuals and a number of normative institutions. These institutions tend to produce coordinated interactions between market actors, and these interactions underpin mechanisms that endow market systems with emergent causal powers. Different types of interactions underpin different market mechanisms, including mechanisms like those theorised by mainstream economists, but also others that they tend to neglect, and an adequate understanding of real-world markets depends on analysing these multiple mechanisms and how they interact.
 

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